Piatkus Entice News

Win The Bride Quartet by Nora Roberts

Reissued Bride Quartet 2015
Nora Roberts’ gorgeously romantic Bride Quartet has been reissued with stunning new covers. From the first appearance of Mackensie, Parker, Laurel and Emmaline in Vision in White through to the finale of Happy Ever After, the Bride Quartet is guaranteed to put a smile on your face, whether you’re a bride to be, dreaming of or reminiscing about your big day.

We’ve got a set of all four books to give away to one lucky reader. To be in with the chance of winning, simply answer the following question:

What is the colour traditionally worn for weddings in the UK and US?

A. White
B. Purple
C. Yellow

Answers in the box below, making sure to read our terms and conditions first. Good luck!

Dark romance

UntitledSometimes we all want to take a walk on the wild side, and dive into a book not for the faint-hearted. In honour of Hard Beat, the smoking-hot new instalment of K. Bromberg’s Driven series, and Tillie Cole’s Reap, the stunning follow-up to her bestselling Raze (both out now), we’re taking a look at some of our favourite dark romances – join us if you dare!

The Scarred Souls series – Tillie Cole

Tillie Cole takes us on a powerful and addictive journey into the Brooklyn underworld, where Russian mobsters rule and the muscled hunks of The Dungeon fight not just for survival, but for their women too . . .

Read Raze here: http://bit.ly/1H6wTDN

Read Reap here:  http://bit.ly/1MbMT4t

The Driven series – K. Bromberg

Pulse-pounding and completely unputdownable, K. Bromberg’s Driven books redefine the boundaries of what romance can be, with relationships so complex and screwed-up that you can’t help but be drawn in.

Read Slow Burn here: http://bit.ly/1Q57c9I

Read Sweet Ache here: http://bit.ly/1Wye3aD

Read Hard Beat here: http://bit.ly/1NqNFyW

Struck by Lightning series – Cecilia Tan

From the moment Katrina meets James, she knows he is different. Daring. Dominating. Over the course of Celia Tan’s smouldering series, the author takes us into the heart of a man with a dark past and even darker desires . . .

Read Slow Surrender here: http://bit.ly/1Q57PAb

Read Slow Seduction here: http://bit.ly/1Q57FIZ

Read Slow Satisfaction here: http://bit.ly/1NqPcVw

Hard Time – Cara McKenna

From the bestselling author of After Hours and Unbound, this is a dark romance like you’ve never seen before – utterly intense and unforgettable; a book to turn your world upside down.

Read Hard Time here: http://bit.ly/1MH4Jln

Let us know what your favourite dark romances are in the comments – and whether there can ever be such a thing as ‘too dark’…

Win the League Series by Sherrilyn Kenyon

Born of Betrayal Born of Betrayal is the eighth installment of Sherrilyn Kenyon’s brilliant League series. If you’ve not yet discovered these delicious futuristic space romances, we’re giving you the chance to get stuck in with the complete set of books from one to eight.

To be in with the chance of winning, simply answer the following question:

What is the name of Sherrilyn Kenyon’s bestselling paranormal romance series?

A. Dark Hunter
B. Light Hunter
C. Hunting Darkness

Answers in the box below, making sure to read our terms and conditions first. Good luck!

How to write a love triangle: Get the inside scoop from Joya Ryan, Tiffany Snow & us

Love triangles are like romance crack to me – put a good one in any story and I’m immediately, helplessly hooked. I’ll swallow any other problems in the story without complaint, buy into any world and hope desperately for the redemption of characters who I know I really should have given up on. At Piatkus, we’re lucky enough to this October publish two authors who excel at creating love triangles – Joya Ryan and Tiffany Snow – and even luckier that they’ve agreed to share their trade secrets on writing love triangles.

Power PlayLove triangle rules à la Tiffany Snow – author of the Risky Business trilogy

  1. Decide how far the love triangle will go. There are various degrees of “love triangle” and in my opinion, a TRUE love triangle is one where the heroine falls in love with BOTH heroes. For instance, did anyone really think Jacob ever had a chance with Bella? Or that Ashley and Scarlett were ever going to get together? But having a heroine fall in love with two different men is a tough scenario to create believably. And then comes the next question: will she have sex with both men? And, if so, how to do that without turning women readers against her? (Women readers are very tough on heroines, especially when it comes to the heroes they adore.) But a love triangle doesn’t have to go that far, as we’ve seen many times in fiction. Just know and have a plan for how and why and how much the heroine will be emotionally involved with each hero.
  2.  Don’t go for the easy way out. Locked in a love triangle and don’t know what to do? Death starts looking pretty darn good — for one of your heroes, that is. Kill one off and voilà! The heroine’s choice is made for her. Or, Option B, have one of the heroes do something so reprehensible, the readers (and the heroine) are left with no choice but the alternative. Stay true to your characters and dig deeper for that reason why one love story is going to work out and the other one won’t.
  3. Be Prepared for the Fallout. Unless the love triangle is erotica, someone’s going to lose in the end. Romance readers get emotionally invested in characters — that’s one of the many reasons they’re the best! And with that investment comes disappointment and sometimes anger when a love triangle doesn’t end to their satisfaction. I think every romance writer of a love triangle has had the hate messages and angry emails at the end of a series (or during) when their preferred hero doesn’t get the girl. The old saying is true: you can’t make everyone happy. Be sure to stick to YOUR vision for the story and give readers a reason to follow your emotional logic. Don’t pull a rabbit out of the hat at the end and expect readers who’ve faithfully followed (oftentimes for many books) to be pleased. End the love triangle in a way that justifies the work put in to creating it.


Yours TonightLove triangle rules à la Joya Ryan – author of the Reign series

  1.  Friendly Competition: There’s nothing wrong with a bit of friendly fire when it comes to getting the girl. Keeping dude one and dude two in check with each other keeps the heat revved up and the scenes spicy. Going for the girl can be a tricky match, so each guy has to bring his A game.
  2.  Earn it: One of the best parts of writing a love triangle is pitting two strong men, not against each other, but against themselves. They want the girl? They have to earn her. Why are they the best man? How can they prove that to her and the reader? That key element of breaking down the hero and showing what he’s really made of and why the heroine should be with him is what keeps the story constantly spiraling forward.
  3.  Mr. Man Must Be Unique: Each hero in the story has to have his own flare. He possess something the other hero doesn’t and it’s that something that the heroine needs. Each man has different skills, strengths and taps into a special side of the heroine. It’s the men’s uniqueness from each other and from other men that keep the reader going back and forth on who to cheer for. Because they’re both awesome in their own way!


And finally, here are three points from an editorial point of view, as I had a think about what really makes them work for me as an editor:

  1. Make the choice difficult. Too often, I see love triangles made up of the ‘right on paper’ choice and the maverick choice that you just know is the only one who’s capable of making the heroine truly happy. Don’t get me wrong, I love that too (I’m basically a sucker for anything involving three characters and a choice for the heroine to make) but where this doesn’t work is if much of the excitement in the story is meant to flow from who the heroine ends up with. If both men aren’t deeply appealing in their individual ways, it can make for a very frustrating read. It becomes harder to sympathise with a heroine going back-and-forth over this kind of choice, which automatically distances your readers from the story.
  2. Explore the difference. I find the most compelling triangles occur when each hero brings out a different aspect of the heroine – the more you can tie her choice in with the heroine’s character arc, with the kind of person she wants to be, the more powerful the story is likely to become – the stakes will be higher if we believe that her ultimate choice will also impact her overall character.
  3. Give the heroine agency. It can be very easy for a heroine in this situation to become somewhat passive – someone who keeps being rescued, who is helplessly overcome every time one of the heroes makes a move. Though initially compelling (everyone can understand how she might feel!), without a heroine who has the gumption to make her own choice and fight against her feelings, as well as rebel against the situation as a whole, may begin to lose reader sympathy – make sure she’s got her own story and develops as a character in her own right. What, apart from each of the men, does your heroine want?


Want more love triangles? Of course you do, because THEY ARE AWESOME. We love this list of 26 unforgettable TV triangles, in order of time sustained . . .


Get your copy of Power Play here:                             Get your copy of Yours Tonight here:

Kindle                                                                                           Kindle

iBooks                                                                                           iBooks

Kobo                                                                                              Kobo

Waterstones                                                                                Waterstones


Run away, run into their arms or crush them like a bug?

It started with talk of Halloween costumes, then it turned to the paranormal – vampires, shifters, witches and more – and became inspired by the writing of Christine Feehan, Thea Harrison, Lindsey Piper, Sherrilyn Kenyon and Kristen Callihan.

Now we ask you the burning question: When the veil between the worlds wears thin and things that go bump in the night abound, do you run away, run into their arms or crush them like a bug?

Scenario 1

You’ve survived the type of childhood that would make the Bates family in Psycho seem normal, and become the type of cop that could give the Special Forces a run for their money. Then you wake up after being caught in a shootout to find: ‘A man [is] standing over [you]. Very tall, powerful. A predator . . . [and] Completely hot.’ He gives you back your gun when you ask for it. Do you run or do you stay?

Dark GuardianAsk that same question again when you find out he’s not human.


Question inspired by Dark Guardian by Christine Feehan.




Scenario 2

Fae, vampires and dragons, oh my. You’ve spent your life keeping a low profile among the Elder Races, that is until that rat b*st*rd blackmailed you into stealing from a frickin’ dragon! Now you’ve been caught, pretty much red-handed, and are in a very difficult situation. Do you turn to the incredibly hot dragon you’ve just stolen from for help, or do you leg it?

Dragon Bound



Question inspired by Thea Harrison’s Dragon Bound.




Scenario 3

You’re a Dragon King (gender neutral species name), but for most of your life you’ve been a slave and most recently a prisoner, known only as ‘the Pet’. You’ve escaped and are on a mission you know could change the fate of your entire species, but your exceedingly-hot, former jailer keeps getting in the way. Do you hog tie him and hoof it, or bring him along?

Hunted Warrior



Question inspired by Lindsey Piper’s Hunted Warrior.




Scenario 4

You’re washing up the dishes in the kitchen when there’s a flash of light, you turn around to discover: ‘A handsome man. A naked man!’ Strangely he looks exactly like the love slave your bestie, a witch, tried to conjure for your birthday present. Even stranger, since you’ve never believed in the paranormal, let alone an ongoing war between vampires, gods and who knows what else. What do you do? Run like hell? Fling the dishes at him? Jump him?

Fantasy Lover



Question inspired by Sherrilyn Kenyon’s Fantasy Lover.




Scenario 5

You spend your evenings skulking through the streets of Victorian London. You may be young but you’re no stranger to the supernatural and are ‘older than most Mayfair debutantes offered up for sale’. You meet a mysterious man – who you discover is incredibly fit when you sensibly check him for weapons – on one of your late night jaunts, he has you cornered . . . Do you fight, stand your ground or slip away?



Question inspired by Kristen Callihan’s Firelight.





Do let us know just what you would do. You might even turn this into a party game; we had hours of fun.

Eloisa James & Julia Quinn Chat Ideas, Research, Books & More



Good heavens! It’s been quite a week for Piatkus Fiction and ladies, we’re positively faint! *fans self elegantly, reaches for the smelling salts but –oops – finds the gin . . .* We admit it has at times been tiresome typing in gloves, insisting that email is not a thing and sitting on our office chairs in corsets (particularly for poor Dominic), but needs must.

All joking aside* we’ve had a wonderful time sharing such great content with you all! It’s been very exciting to see your enthusiasm for our brilliant authors and I’m delighted to present the final piece – a fantastic interview between two Regency romance greats: Eloisa James and Julia Quinn. This made us laugh out loud in the middle of the office – we hope very much that you enjoy it too.

*but not the gin. The gin stays where it is.


Julia: Okay, Eloisa, I’ll go first since my deadline is sooner which means I am more eager to procrastinate. I want to know what the first thing is that comes into your mind when someone asks, “Where do you get your ideas?” Because we get asked that ALL the time, and we never have a good answer.

Eloisa: “At the sale counter, going cheap — two heroines for the price of a pirate!” More seriously, I think I get them from reading. And watching movies and TV. I saw a couple episodes of House, M.D. on a plane once and ended up turning a version of the good doctor into the hero of When Beauty Tamed the Beast. How about you, Julia? Let’s talk blatant theft. What’s the last movie that inspired you to write?

Julia: When I steal things, I’m never quite so blatant. (Well, except for An Offer from a Gentleman, but who doesn’t love a good Cinderella story?) It’s more that I’ll watch a movie or read a book and it’ll inspire a feeling in me that gets me writing. That said, sometimes there are little concrete nuggets that inspire a book, even if no one would see the connection but me. For example, The Lost Duke of Wyndham and Mr. Cavendish, I Presume were inspired by a Dire Straits Song! (“Industrial Disease,” in case you’re interested.)

Eloisa: Hey, I love Dire Straits! I just taught his “Romeo and Juliet” (in Shakespeare class, natch). So that makes me think: you’ve rewritten Cinderella. Have you ever thought of doing a Beauty and the Beast? Because I have the title: The Beautiful, Beastly Bridgerton!

Julia: This is why I don’t turn to you when trying to come up with titles for my books.

Eloisa: Yeah, our publisher rejects them too. I would love to put Bodacious in a title. Bodacious Bridgerton? No? Seriously, do you come up with your own titles? Because all my best titles have come from my editor, who has a positive gift for it. What’s your favorite title?

Julia: I’d say I’ve come up with about three-quarters of them. My favorite is probably How to Marry a Marquis. It was my first really clever title. I actually sort-of kind-of stole it from Candice Hern. She’d written a traditional regency in the vein of Georgette Heyer that she wanted to call How to Marry a Duke. Her editor hated it and they changed to something totally nondescript. When Candice told me about this, I immediately said, “Can I have it?” A little alliteration later and it was How to Marry a Marquis.

I think this might have been the only time I had a title before I had a book idea, and it actually took me several years to come up with a plot to go with it. I was completely at a loss until this book called The Rules came out, purporting to be a modern-day guide to catching a husband. I immediately thought, “A-ha! Jane Austen meets The Rules!”

In retrospect, this was probably my only true high-concept novel.

Eloisa: I’m trying to think if I’ve ever written a high concept novel . . .  I don’t think so. My plots usually spring from a funny detail that I somehow turn into a whole book. The idea for My American Duchess sprang from a visit to a British historical house where the dining room table featured a pineapple on a silver platter. The docent told us that pineapples were so expensive and fashionable that people used to rent them for a dinner party! I instantly thought up an American heroine who would horrify high society by asking for a slice of pineapple. From there, I had a wonderful time coming up with more mistakes that Merry could inadvertently make. Did any of your novels spring from one funny idea?

Julia: No, but I did have one novel spring up from an opening line. The first line of To Catch an Heiress just popped into my head fully-formed: “Caroline Trent hadn’t meant to shoot Percival Prewitt, but she had, and now he was dead.”

I have to say, I’m fascinated about that pineapple thing. I’d never heard of that! Food is one of those things I find I’m always researching. That and flora in general. I can’t tell you how much time I’ve wasted spent trying to figure out which flowers are in bloom and when in specific regions of England. My latest research time-sink has been the American Revolutionary War. Because of Miss Bridgerton is set in England, but the hero’s brother is a captain in the 54th Regiment of Foot, stationed in New England and New York. I spent hours and hours figuring out which regiment he needed to be in in order to put him where I want him crazy — since he doesn’t even appear in the book! What about you? What’s your latest research black hole?

Eloisa: After my dissertation-level research into the status of pineapples in the western world (ask me anything!), my most recent foray has been into the world of Registry Offices, from which people would hire servants. The heroine of the book I’m writing at the moment, Seven Minutes in Heaven, owns a registry office for governesses. Even talking about my manuscript makes me nervous, though . . .  I should be writing it. Why don’t I ask one last question. What book are you writing right now, and what’s the heroine like?

Julia: I’m putting the finishing touches on Because of Miss Bridgerton. The heroine is the eponymous Miss Bridgerton — Billie Bridgerton, to be more specific. She’s a total tomboy, utterly devoted to her home and village, and about to fall in love with the guy who has been the bane of her existence for years. She doesn’t own a registry office, but she’s really into managing her father’s estate, which means I got to research barley and mulch. I’m thinking pineapples sound like more fun.

Eloisa: OK, I’m off to google wax flowers (every governess needs to know how to make them), leaving Julia to research pineapple stoves (seriously, all the best estates had one!).
Enjoyed #RegencyWeek? To make sure you don’t miss out on similar future events, sign up to our newsletter, like us on Facebook  or follow us on Twitter @PiatkusBooks.

Farewell for now, dear readers – may your future involve many dukes, cads of only the most entertaining kind and a multitude of gilded invitations!

Pre-order your copy of My American Duchess here:







Google Play


To pre-order your copy of Because of Miss Bridgerton go here:






Google Play



Erin Knightley Brings Twitter to Regency England

The Duke Can Go to the DevilFor our last day of #RegencyWeek we wished to LOL, so naturally we went to Erin Knightley, who kindly brought Twitter to Regency England and the hero and heroine of  The Duke Can Go to the Devil.

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

Daughter of a sea captain, possessor of own mind.

The Far East will always be home, even when temporarily

stuck in not-so-jolly old England.


The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

   You may call me Your Grace.


Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

Met a pompous duke last night. But then again, is there any other kind? #beaumondesnobs

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

@WorldTravelerMay Might you be referring to our disastrous meeting last night? Funny. All I remember is your legendary impertinence. #rude

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

Surprise! The @DukeofRad is sticking his nose where it doesn’t belong again. I bet butting into conversations is a special talent of yours.

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

@WorldTravelerMay Merely a talent for knowing when I’m being discredited. Is your aunt speaking to you yet? Surprised you’re on here at all…

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad My aunt would never be here — she’s still stuck in the last century. Of course, I would have thought the same of you… #oldfashioned

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

@WorldTravelerMay Propriety never goes out of fashion. Neither do apologies. *waits patiently*

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad LMAO! Get comfortable, because you’re going to be waiting a looong time. Oh! Unless you meant you’re waiting to apologize to *me*

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad *waits patiently*

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

I’m pleased to be attending the ball this week. Thank you to the committee for their excellent organisation of this event.

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad Decided to ignore me, I see. If only you’d done so last night, I wouldn’t be stuck groveling for my aunt’s mercy. >:-{

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

@WorldTravelerMay You’ve only yourself to blame, Miss Bradford. *Such* a pity you won’t be attending the ball. #sorrynotsorry

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad Aw, was that your first “I’m sorry?” I’m honored! *frames tweet*

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

@WorldTravelerMay You know very well that was no apology.

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad Well, we both know it couldn’t have been sarcasm since, as you so condescendingly pointed out, “Sarcasm is the lowest from of wit.”

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad Therefore…apology accepted. #May1Duke0

The Duke of Radcliffe @DukeOfRad

@WorldTravelerMay *scowls* I am not amused.

Mei-li Bradford @WorldTravelerMay

@DukeofRad Ah, but I am, which means I win. #quittingwhileimahead #MayOut

We absolutely adore May and The Duke of Rad, as he will be henceforth known in the office. If you’d like more of them, get Erin’s latest book here:






Five Reasons Women Had it Better in Regency Times

Ok, so they couldn’t vote, husbands and fathers had total control over their lives and the fashions occasionally cracked a rib or two, but there were some upsides to being a woman in the 18th Century. From all-night parties to wet nurses, Historical author Joanna Taylor explains.

Regency romance 1
1. All nighters

With no licensing laws and plenty of private parties, revellers went on all night. Popular gatherings like masquerade balls served an extra dinner at midnight to keep the revellers dancing until dawn. And with wine glasses around 2/3rds smaller than our modern-day buckets, people got less drunk (or at least paced themselves) and had more staying power.

Party-goers even breakfasted on the remains of the dinner from the night before and headed out to the nearest tavern. Time to party like it’s 1799 …


2. Credit in your husband’s name

Regency women had no rights whatsoever to their own money. But this turned in women’s favour when London shops began issuing huge store credit. Female shoppers could rack up a huge bill and put it in their husband’s name. If he couldn’t cover the store charges, she was exempt from any prosecution or responsibility. But he was liable to pay her bill. This was such a problem for one poor Regency husband that he even took a newspaper advertisement with his wife’s description asking shops not to serve her. Spend it up ladies!


3. High maintenance desserts

Labour intensive cakes were the order of the day. As was elaborate sugar-work. Antoine Careme, celebrity Regency chef of the day constructed jaw-dropping constructions in sugar. These included a table length ‘extraordinaire’ model of a Grecian temple and a replica of the Brighton Pavilion.

In domestic kitchens recipes included seed cake (beaten for two hours) and steamed puddings boiled overnight in cloths. Marzipan sweets, cream pastries and all manner of other delicacies also made it onto the table. Hot chocolate was routinely served for breakfast. And plumpness was fashionable. For women with a sweet tooth, Regency was their time to shine.


4. Tailor-made clothes

Size 10 waist with a size 12 bust? Don’t worry about it! Your dressmaker will take your preferred fabric and map it perfectly to your exact size. Favourite dress chafing after a few too many plum puddings? No problem! Have it let out for pennies. Ready-to-wear is decades away and as long as you secure the fabric of your choice you can be sure the dress will fit.  Better yet those flattering Regency waistlines hide a multitude of sins.


5. Wet nurses

For Regency mummies, there was no agonising over whether breast is best. They simply handed their tots to an experienced wet nurse and she did the rest. Fashionable Parisians took this one step further and farmed their children out to country wet nurses until they were two. So no late night feeds, maternity bras or sterilising bottles for these ladies. They went back to the serious business of socialising within weeks of giving birth. Why let a baby get in the way of a good party?

Enjoyed reading this? Masquerade, Joanna Taylor’s Regency take on Pretty Woman, is out NOW!

To buy a copy, go here:


Sarah MacLean is Launching a New Series!!!

The Rogue Not TakenNew York Times, Washington Post & USA Today bestseller Sarah MacLean is launching a new series and she’s agreed to share a few teasers of just what we can expect! Plus, this is the first time we’ve shared the cover!

I’m so excited to be launching a new series this year —  Scandal & Scoundrel merges 21st Century Celebrity Gossip with Pre-Victorian England. Below, Five Features of The Rogue Not Taken the first in Scandal & Scoundrel novel!

1) A Rapscallion Rogue Kingscote, Marquess of Eversely, who goes by the near-blasphemous moniker “King,” is famous for ending engagements; there isn’t a woman in Britain who can resist him . . . even those about to be married. King is a rogue’s rogue, however . . . and he has no intention of ever marrying.

2) A Sister to Scandal – Lady Sophie Talbot is the youngest of a particularly scandalous set of sisters  known to all of London as “The Dangerous Daughters” (readers of modern gossip rags will recognise Sophie’s sisters as akin to a certain K-initialed clan!)  It’s not easy being the youngest, plainest and most uninteresting of such a becoming brood, however, and when scandal finds Sophie, it’s outrageous.

3) An Unwelcome Stowaway  When Sophie escapes society’s censure, she unwittingly lands herself in King’s Border-bound carriage . . . much to their mutual dismay. Between uncomfortable carriage rides, unplanned stops and unwelcome highwaymen, the journey north is unexpected, to say the least.

4) A Curricle Club   Why should contemporary romance heroes have all the vehicular fun? King would ride motorcycles with the best of them  he’s got the leather pants and the raucous friends to prove it. He’s obsessed with his first-class curricle, built to such unique specification that it requires custom carriage wheels. Until, Sophie gets hold of them. And he’s got no choice but to ride via coach.

5) The Attraction of Opposition  Sophie and King are everything the other loathes, and what ensues is the most rompy of my books to date. He thinks she’s after his title, and she wouldn’t have him if he were the last man on earth. They don’t even like each other. Except when they’re kissing. They like that bit quite a bit.


The Rogue Not Taken is out Dec 29th, and is up for pre-order now!







Google Play